Eat or be Eaten: Tips for a Bite-Free Backyard BBQ

Eat or be Eaten: Tips for a Bite-Free Backyard BBQ on platinummosquito.com

Mosquitos need stagnant water, still air, and a lack of off-putting scents to find their way onto the guest list

You’ve made plans for a backyard BBQ to bite into some good grilled food, but you don’t recall inviting mosquitos and other pests to bite into you.

There’s food involved, so the last thing you want to do is get crazy with strong-smelling (and questionably effective) citronella. Are there solutions you can try to keep these uninvited guests away and offer a bite-free backyard BBQ for those you actually did ask to join you? Few things are guaranteed when it comes to mosquitos, but here are some solutions to try.

Make them feel unwanted

Chasing them away is one option. A better solution is taking steps that prevent mosquitos and other biting bests from showing up in the first place. Think in terms of this trio: water, air, and skin.

  • Water: Stagnant water is an ideal breeding environment for mosquitos. Start with doing a recon – well ahead of time and on a regular basis – of your backyard and getting rid of any sources of standing water. Don’t overlook rainwater that collects in clogged gutters, pools on furniture covers, or collects in your children’s outdoor toys. Fountains and birdbaths deserve your attention, too. Especially if the water doesn’t circulate. Change it weekly.
  • Air: Circulating air makes it difficult for mosquitos to detect your location and zoom in for a bite. Install a ceiling fan on your patio or porch. This is the best air circulating solution because it keeps things out of the way of your guests, and ceiling fans tend to be quiet. If it’s not possible, opt for a couple of oscillating table fans. The objective is to keep the air around your guests moving.
  • Skin: The option to wear long sleeves and pants tends to take the fun out of enjoying a warm evening in the backyard as you host a BBQ. Covering up exposed skin, however, is one of the most effective ways to prevent mosquito bites. If the temperature makes this an uncomfortable choice, make sure to apply mosquito repellent with DEET.

While you’ve got the grill going

You’re already familiar with the concept of mosquito coils. After they’re lit, they give off a smell that repels mosquitos. Most people don’t mind the smell, but it can bother some of your guests. There’s another way. Its effect on mosquitos is hit or miss, but at least it might help you take your BBQ to the next level in terms of taste.

Keep in mind that this only works if you’re using a charcoal grill. You might repel pests by infusing your BBQ meat or vegetables with the essence of sage or rosemary. Head to your favorite grocery store and stock up on some fresh sprigs of these two herbs.

Place the sprigs directly on top of your smoldering coals. Then replace the grill and start cooking. If you find this to be effective, you’ll need to add another round of sprigs about every 30 minutes.

The easier, automatic way to repel mosquitos

Repellent applied (and reapplied) to the skin, long sleeves and pants, certain smells, and fans may help you keep from being the main course for mosquitos during your next backyard BBQ. These solutions can work, but they’ll require effort and possibly some compromise. If you’d rather keep your attention focused on perfect medium-rare steaks, talk to Platinum Mosquito Protection about an automatic misting system. It’s maintenance-free protection that works automatically – and incredibly well.

For more information about how the system works or a free on-site consultation, get in touch with us today.

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