A Homeowner’s Guide to the Biology of Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes are some of the peskiest creatures that we interact with. They invade your privacy, can leave bites that consistently itch, and they can even transfer deadly diseases. Knowing basic information about mosquitoes’ biology could help control them and keep them away from your home. 

How & Where Mosquitoes Lay Eggs

Most mosquito species will lay their eggs on a water surface. For example, they will utilize decorative ponds and pools in your backyard, or even a nearby wash. However, different species vary with how they lay them. Culex mosquitoes typically lay their eggs in groups between 100-300. By contrast, Anopheles, Aedes, and Ochlerotatus mosquitoes lay their eggs one at a time. Larvae will then hatch from these eggs within a couple days.

Larvae & Pupa

After the eggs are hatched, they remain in water as larvae anywhere from a few days to a couple weeks. They will frequently come to the surface for oxygen, and eat anything around them including plankton, algae, and sometimes even other larvae. After shedding its skin four times, the larvae become pupa.  In this stage, they float and do not eat. There is a case around the body, and after a few days the adult mosquito will pierce through this, and wait on the water surface for its body to dry.

Adult Mosquitoes

Interestingly enough, only female mosquitoes require blood, because it is vital to produce eggs. Male mosquitoes only feed on nectar. Most blood-feeding mosquitoes do not target humans as their primary source, but it is important to be mindful of them, anyway. Using repellent and installing control systems around your home is a good way to protect yourself.

Are you looking to shield your house from mosquitoes? Look no further than Platinum Mosquito Protection. We provide Miami and the surrounding areas with mosquito control and misting systems to keep these annoying insects away. Call us at (954) 793-4735, or visit our website for more information.